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Writing a Thesis

A thesis is a lengthy paper and it is one that is usually required when an undergraduate approaches the end of their studies, or it is required at the end of a year of postgraduate studies. This type of paper is built on a hypothesis, which should be developed over an entire program or course.

The way a thesis is structured is one of its most essential elements, and this should be logical without varying or digressing from the subject matter. Because it is an important paper, it must have considerable substance, and this depends to a large extent on the subject area as well as the topic the student chooses.

A worthwhile thesis should have a certain essential quality that is usually qualified and determined by the student’s abilities, the expert knowledge they demonstrate, and their command of their subject matter.   

If a thesis is to be valid, it should show a combination of the skills acquired from several diverse subject areas and topics. The culmination should be a written product that verifies the expertise the student has acquired while studying for their degree. A thesis has a unique feature insofar as it must put forward a hypothesis and endeavor to propose a solution.  

Steps Involved in Writing a Worthy Thesis

  • Think back over the material covered since you were in your first year. List every essay, course, quiz, exam, and project you participated in.
  • Give weight to this list by briefly describing each of the above activities. Then you should create a plan from this expanded list or summary.
  • Your topic will need to be analyzed and discussed with your course supervisor, and your paper should include a hypothesis. The wording should also be developed in an expert way and in a manner that includes the most important points in terms of the material you covered during your studies.  
  • Collect every piece of information you can in terms of the latest references from such sources as articles, books, journals, websites, and other academic materials. A certain amount of this will be vital and already known to you.
  • Allow sufficient time for all the reading you will need to do.
  • Make lots of useful notes and begin drafting your thesis from your revised materials. Give the topic a new angle and a fresh perspective.
  • Leave writing your introductory paragraph until the end. This will give you the chance to develop an effective hypothesis introduce your paper in the best possible way.

Selecting a Topic

There are two essential things to remember when choosing a topic. The first thing is that your chosen topic must be place in its rightful context with any existing work in that field. Additionally, it must be succinctly stated, which means you need to ensure this same topic has not been studied by anyone else since a thesis is all about presenting fresh knowledge and insight in a given field. The second important thing in selecting a suitable topic is whether it will help you prove or not that your work is of significant value to your intended readers. While subjective interest is essential when selecting a topic for your thesis, its objective importance also matters. Put another way, you might discover how holes are made in macaroni, but such knowledge is not likely to be of huge benefit to the science world.

Another important thing to bear in mind when selecting a topic is this: it is rare for a truly original idea to enter an individual’s head of its own accord. Hence, it must be sought. This can be done through brainstorming, research, and by studying existing research in the particular field, you are interested in.

Main Points for Consideration

  • It is very likely that a thesis will be the most crucial paper you will write during your years in education. It is designed to bring a study program to a logical closure. It additionally shows an examinations board and readers outside your campus of the quality of your capabilities. This paper should showcase all you have understood and learned, and it should add fresh information to a particular field.
  • Other elements that should be appear in a thesis include a contents list (or table of contents), an abstract, a references list, and a cover or title page. These depend on a particular college’s guidelines and the chosen style.
  • A thesis is quite a long paper, but this can vary depending on the subject, field of expertise, and selected topic. In any case, a thesis should be at least sixty pages long with a plentiful amount of references i.e. around 25 cited sources or even more. Make sure that all references are less than five years old, particularly if the topic is of a scientific nature, topical or concerns information technology (IT).   
  • While a lot depends on the college or university and on the subject area, a thesis for undergraduate level is graded according to the quality of the research, how influential these are, and on the presentation and writing style.
  • A thesis for postgraduate level, e.g. for a PhD degree should make an original and new contribution to its field or scholarship. It should add to the sum of existing knowledge. It should offer a theory or a reinterpretation of existing records and well-established concepts.
  • To store references and keep them from getting confused and disorganized, you could use charts or a piece of software like Endnote. Store all notes together in paper-based folders and written work in a folder in your word-processing software.

What You Should and Should Not Do

What You Should Do

  • Keep track of the decisions you arrive at while researching and make a note of any alterations. It is worth maintaining a diary of your research, note-making, references, and writing.
  • Remember to use choose the referencing or formatting style you were instructed to use, e.g., APA, Chicago, MLA, or Turabian.
  • Begin and end in an academic and engaging manner without any show of ostentatiousness.

 What You Should Not Do

  • Do not leave out important details.
  • Do not “flesh” out your work with fluff and trivia.
  • Do not overlook the fact that you will be demonstrating your subject knowledge in this important project.
  • Avoid using clichés or tired phrases. An essential feature of a worthwhile thesis is ensuring it contains precise language.
  • Do not forget that punctuation, grammar, syntax, and your choice of words can have an impact on meaning, and that your semantic abilities must make a good impression on the examinations board.
  • Being too hurried with reading material, condensing research work, and drafting a paper in too tight a timeframe.
  • Repeating oneself. A thesis should be based on original and new thinking, so you should not be tempted to copy from papers you previously wrote or projects you previously worked on. Everything should be written freshly, even if it is on a similar or the same topic you have already written about.  
  • Allowing the hypothesis to stray from the one agreed with a course supervisor. You should stick strictly to the theme and wording of your chosen topic.
  • Poor or no focus. Students sometimes include a huge amount of materials in their paper without giving priority to the essential material covered on their degree program.  
  • Failure to collect information in a methodical manner. If your work is disordered and muddled, the entire project can become random and haphazard.
  • An absence of sound analysis. Regurgitating material found in primary sources is not sufficient. The writer must analyze all material and make deductions, think critically, and develop a new hypothesis that is interesting and sticks in the memory.
  • Failing to present a paper that is well planned and fully integrated. A thesis needs to be formulated through reading, synthesizing, and properly summarizing research materials. This essentially means analyzing other people’s work to produce one’s own original work.  

Frequent Mistakes

  • Being too hurried with reading material, condensing research work, and drafting a paper in too tight a timeframe.
  • Repeating oneself. A thesis should be based on original and new thinking, so you should not be tempted to copy from papers you previously wrote or projects you previously worked on. Everything should be written freshly, even if it is on a similar or the same topic you have already written about.  
  • Allowing the hypothesis to stray from the one agreed with a course supervisor. You should stick strictly to the theme and wording of your chosen topic.
  • Poor or no focus. Students sometimes include a huge amount of materials in their paper without giving priority to the essential material covered on their degree program.  
  • Failure to collect information in a methodical manner. If your work is disordered and muddled, the entire project can become random and haphazard.
  • An absence of sound analysis. Regurgitating material found in primary sources is not sufficient. The writer must analyze all material and make deductions, think critically, and develop a new hypothesis that is interesting and sticks in the memory.
  • Failing to present a paper that is well planned and fully integrated. A thesis needs to be formulated through reading, synthesizing, and properly summarizing research materials. This essentially means analyzing other people’s work to produce one’s own original work.  

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